George Ela

George Ela.
Courtesy Arnett C. Lines Collection

George Ela was the first settler to arrive in Palatine Township and an early settler in Barrington. It is important to study George Ela because he was a part of the massive change in the cultural landscape of this part of the world.
The following information was compiled by David Hammer and is a chronology of the life of Mr. Ela together with footnotes and sources.
A big thank you to the Ela Area Historical Society, Ela Township Clerk and Michael Harkins, President of the Barrington History Museum, for providing copies of documents for this chronology.

George Ela was born to Benjamin and Abigail Ela in Lebanon, N.H. January 17, 1805. (22,23,50,62,93)

The family moved to Concord, N.H. in 1812 and the father “was engaged in building boats, which at that time plyed along the Merrimack river, carrying freight to and from Boston, Newburyport and other places. In 1818 the family returned to Lebanon…” (66)

George went into business in Goffstown, N.H. with Isaac F. Williams November 1, 1828. The business placed an advertisement December 29, 1828 in a Concord newspaper, the New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette:

“GEORGE ELA & CO. have just received at their store in Goffstown, a very large and well selected assortment of GOODS, comprising almost every article usually called for in a country store; some of which are the following: BROADCLOTHS, Pelisse Cloths, Cassimeres, Bombazettes, Flannels, Calicos, Silks, Cambrick, Muslin & Hosiery, Silk Gloves, Shawls and Mantles, Vestings, Bed Ticking, Sheetings and Shirtings, Checks, Gingham and Plaids, Camblets, Thread, Bobinett, Cotton Laces, Ribbons, Thimbles, Shell and other Combs, Suspenders, Cravats, Swiss Muslin and Points, Silk Handkerchiefs, Nankin and Canton Crapes, Lace Veils, Gauze Veils, Italian Crapes, Pressed Crape, SHAWLS, Bombazines and Battistes, Gro. de Naples, Linen Handkerchiefs and Drilling, Leather Mittens, Linen Gloves, Fur Trimmings, Black Feathers, Hats and Shoes, W. I. GOODS [West Indies Goods, a euphemism for Rum], HARD AND HOLLOW WARE, LOOKING GLASSES, BUFFALO ROBES, CROCKERY AND GLASS WARE, Fire Setts, Salt, Mackerel, Cod Fish, Iron, Steel, Nails, Window Glass, Logwood, &c, &c, all of which are offered for sale cheap for cash or credit.” (78)

George was licensed to sell spirituous liquors in Goffstown, N.H. in 1828, 1829, 1831-1834. (32)
He employed a young man Harrison Hobson at his store in West Goffstown in 1828. (91)
On May 4th, 1830 eighteen-year-old brother Richard wrote to him and complained that there was no work for him in Lebanon, that no one needed an apprentice and he was dependent on his father. He asked George to come home. (1,22,34,50)

George served as a delegate from Goffstown at the Hillsborough County Democratic Republican Convention at Weare, N.H. January 25, 1831. (83)

Cushing & Hadley took over the business April 30, 1831. (79)

Another advertisement appeared in the same newspaper September 12, 1831:

“The subscribers did on the first of April past form a connexion in business under the firm of ELA & MARSHALL: GEORGE ELA and THOMAS MARSHALL. ELA & MARSHALL have recently erected a large and commodious store in Goffstown Upper Village, a few rods northwest of the store, formerly occupied by the late firm of GEO. ELA & CO., where they offer for sale a large assortment of FRENCH, CANTON, ENGLISH, SCOTCH, INDIA, AMERICAN AND W. I. GOODS & GROCERIES. Their stock is of the best kind, and comprises as good an assortment as can be found in any shop in the country. Those wishing to buy good articles at unusual low prices, will do well to call, as their determination is to sell, they will make it an object for people to purchase. N.B. Tavern keepers supplied with all kinds of Liquors, &c. on the most reasonable terms.”(80)

George married Mary N. Hazeltine, born May 21, 1805 at Bedford, N.H., in October 1832. (4,16,50,62)
George married Mary Noyes (born May 21, 1805) in October, 1833. (92)

Ela & Marshall at Goffstown (Upper Village) advertised October 29, 1832:

“Broadcloth, Cassimeres, Water proof Petersham, Sattinetts, Vestings, Stout Coating, Goats Hair and Imitation Camblets, Flannels, Scotch and Tartan Plaids, Bombazetts, Merinoes and Circassians, Rich London Prints, do American, Bed Ticking, Sheeting, Stout Shirtings, Rich French and English Ginghams, Silk Bandanna Handkerchiefs, Pondgee Handkerchiefs, French Calicoes, Berlin Comforters, Rich Merino Shawls, Raw Silk Shawls, rich Valentia and Thibet Shawls – India, Florence Silks, Synchaw, Dark Gros de Naples and Gros de Berlin Silks, Bishop’s Lawn, CROCKERY AND GLASS WARE, 15 China Tea Setts, N.O. Molasses, N.O. Sugar, Brown Havanna do, White do, Portorico do. Leaf and Lump do, O.H.Y.H. and Sanchong Teas and Lamp Oil. (84)

He appeared in an advertisement as an agent for Rush’s Jaundice Wine Bitters March 13, 1833. (85)

The Ela family may have heard about new opportunities to buy land out West from a young businessman Colbee Benton, also from Lebanon, NH. Benton, having become wealthy, decided to take a trip West and left a diary describing what he saw and heard. On August 20, 1833 he wrote, “I have had a good opportunity to view the town and country about, and I find Chicago a very pleasant place…” (64,65)

On September 26, 1833 the Treaty of Chicago was signed by the U.S. government and representatives of 6,000 Potawatomi. This resulted in their removal from the Great Lakes area to reservations west of the Mississippi River and the sale of five million acres of land to prospective settlers. (60)

In 1834 George was listed as an Ensign in the 5th Company, 9th Regiment, N.H. State Militia with “34 dec” [declined?] after his name. (33)
Richard wrote to George at Goffstown August 19, 1834 that their best hope of ending their poverty and their dependence on their father was to move out West and that they should start no later than October 31st. They had no clear idea where to settle, but they were willing to do any honorable labor. Richard asked his brother if he was willing to pay his [Richard’s] expenses. Otherwise they might have to wait until spring. (2)

Benjamin, father of George, William (born June 19, 1807) and Richard (born May 12, 1812), gave each of his sons $1000 for their venture, but he entrusted George’s money with the two brothers to dole out as needed. George’s business acumen had apparently not been established yet. (50)

On April 1, 1835 brother Richard set out to “seek his fortune” in the West. He went by stage to Albany, N.Y. and from there by canal boat on the Erie Canal to Buffalo, N.Y. where he worked for several months at the joiner’s trade [cabinetmaker] to make the money necessary for his further travels. (48)
On May 28, 1835 the U.S. Land Office opened up in Chicago on the east side of Lake Street between Clark Street and Dearborn Street. (61)
Richard wrote to George [address not given] July 1835 that he was working at the Joiners business in Buffalo. George had hoped to accompany him but was unable to. Richard wrote that out West “chances to get wealth certainly are better than in the old States”. (3)

Richard left Buffalo by schooner on the Great Lakes, and a thirteen day journey brought him to Chicago on September 14, 1835, from where he went to Plainfield, Ill. and obtained work in a saw mill chopping and rolling logs. (48)
George came to Ela Township in the fall of 1835 and made a claim of land at Deer Grove. (19,22,50,62)
It is believed Deer Grove was named before the coming of the white man. (46)
Richard wrote from Plainfield to George [address not given] February 29, 1836 that George had a good claim and had to decide soon whether to go on it or stay in Chicago. He advised George to sell his beloved horse Caty and buy a cheap horse that could live without oats and use the remainder of the money to buy provisions and tools and go onto the claim immediately and bring wife Mary as soon as things were comfortable. He urged George to build a rail fence, cut down and sell the trees, plough the field and then sell the land for as much as he could. (4)

George moved onto his claim and built a house in Deer Grove in the spring of 1836. (19,22,24,26,27,50)
He conducted a store at Deer Grove and was said to be the only resident within twenty miles of Barrington. (30)
About 1836 brother William Stickney Ela moved to Chicago, said to be a town of about 1500 inhabitants, half Indian, to seek his fortune but returned to Lebanon a year later. (50)
Richard wrote to George at Deer Grove in an undated letter that he was looking at opportunities in Wisconsin. (5)

George’s mother Abigail (Emerson) Ela died March 22, 1836. (49)

Survey maps of Ela Township and Palatine Township 1837-38 show a field surrounding what is now Quentin Road and Lake Cook Road in Deer Grove and a house south southwest of that intersection. (6)
A 2004 plat gives the exact location of George Ela’s house as described by the original survey party when the site was surveyed May 19, 1838. The six members of the survey party and their occupations are listed. (58)
Settlers had already staked out claims in 1837-38 when Ela Township was surveyed. (52)
A map by V. Irish shows a road leading northwest through Section 4 in Palatine Township from George Ela’s claim. (36)
December 18, 1838 brother Richard wrote to his father thanking him for sending him the very large sum of money he had asked for in the form of checks. Richard cashed these checks at the Illinois land office in Chicago. Impending land sales made this money very valuable. (63)
Possibly the father helped George in the same way.

A 2000 Long Grove planning document states that the home of George Ela “still stands as part of the Goldbogen home on Quentin Road” and that it is “shown as existing when the first government survey was made in 1838.” (88)
However, there is no further evidence that Ela lived in the Goldbogen home at 23904 North Quentin Road, nor is there a house shown at that location on the survey map of Ela Township 1837-1838.

A few years later George moved north of the Lake Cook county line, building a home and farm on 100 acres of prairie fronting on the west side of today’s Quentin Road, between Lake Cook and Long Grove Roads. It appears his home also contained a general store. (52)
George’s home was located where Fred Fuller lives near Quentin Corner. (69)

The Rue Valley Subdivision was built northwest of Lake Cook Road and Quentin Road in the mid-1970s and may have destroyed any evidence of George’s property. (74)

A 1978 real estate advertisement for Lieberman Realtors for a home in the Long Grove area stated, “Live in history in the original George Ela home shown in first government survey in 1838. Two acres of woods surround this lovely modernized version of early Americana…” Photograph included. (47) I have had no success locating this home.
The United States Land Office at Little Fort did not open until 1840, but land could be claimed by “entry”. (52)

Thousands of settlers poured into the area northwest of Chicago before surveyors had a chance to complete their work. To help these “squatters” gain title to their claims Congress passed the Preemption Act of 1841 effective January 1, 1841. The law required them to be living and working on the land for five years. It gave men like George Ela a chance to buy the land they were claiming before the state offered it to anybody else. State of Illinois public domain land records indicate that February 6-8, 1841 George paid $400.74 for 320.59 acres extending half a mile west and one mile south of what is now Quentin Road and Lake Cook Road. (7,54,72)

George’s father Benjamin died in Lebanon, N.H. November 4, 1841. (49)

George purchased 110.81 acres of land northwest of what is now Quentin Road and Lake Cook Road from Andrus Rupel December 17, 1841. This was the first of over a hundred Lake County property transactions on record for him at the Lake County Recorder of Deeds office in Waukegan. Most of these properties were in Ela and Cuba Townships. It is safe to say he became a wealthy landowner. (73)

The first post office in Ela Township was established in 1844 at the house of George Ela, who was appointed the first Postmaster. The name of the office was Surryse. Afterward it was changed to Ela. (19,29,52,62,75)
An archaeological survey of George’s farmstead in Palatine Township in 2000 by the C.A.V.E. Group, Inc. yielded the following description: “Cabin & barn razed. Artifacts: 1 square nail, 1 handforged door hinge, 1 doorlock, 2 harness rivets, 1 trigger guard, 1 bridle cheek piece, 1 sm. barrel hoop, 1 cattle nosering, 2 embossed non ferrous metal plates, 1 pocket knife, misc. handforged chains….Local archives state he lived at the site until 1844. Some artifacts date to 1840’s.” (56)
A series of letters between David Hammer and Terry Martin, Curator and Chair of Anthropology at the Illinois State Museum September 2009 revealed that John Carr of the C.A.V.E. Group suffered a stroke and during the move to an assisted living facility the artifact collection was likely accidently discarded as rubbish. (59)
On September 16, 1845 George bought an additional 40 acres of land from the government in what is now Kildeer’s Pine Valley subdivision possibly for speculation. (52,55)

A post office named Serryse was established March 23, 1846 and George appointed postmaster. (41,52)
He ran for election to the Illinois House of Representatives in August 1846 and won. (20)
A table of post offices listed Serryse as an entry October 1, 1846. (8)
George served in the Illinois House of Representatives beginning December 7, 1846. (9)
He voted for Stephen A. Douglass for United States Senator December 12, 1846. (10)
He introduced a bill to legalize roads laid out in Lake County January 13, 1847. (9)
He represented Lake County at a Democratic convention in Ottawa, Ill. June 6, 1848 and voted for John Wentworth for Congress. (11)

In 1849 a successful referendum was held to divide Lake County into townships. (52)
The Lake County Commissioners chose the name Ela for Township 43 North, Range 10 East because George was one of the first settlers, was a prominent citizen and represented the county in the state legislature. (19,21,29,35)
Ela Township had its first town meeting April 2, 1850. He lost the election for Justice of the Peace. (51, 67)
He is listed in the United States Census November 29, 1850 at Ela Township as a farmer from N.H. 45 years old living with Mary from N.H. 45 years old and Delia, female from Canada 13 years old. Value of real estate $6000. (12)

He helped form a society for the promotion and encouragement of agriculture at Waukegan, Ill. in 1851. (18)
At the Ela town meeting April 1, 1851 he was chosen Overseer of Highways for District #11. (67)
In August 1851 the editor of the Porcupine took a trip through southwest Lake County. On Section 33 in Ela Township near the southern boundary he found a store kept by George Ela. (28,29,30)
The post office of Surryse was moved from George Ela’s house to William Quentin’s Cheap Variety Store at the southwest corner of Quentin Road and Rand Road and the name changed to Ela Post Office February 16, 1852. (41,53)
He was elected Ela Township Supervisor April 6, 1852. (67)
He was reelected Supervisor April 5, 1853. (67)
Mail arrangement was listed in the Chicago Tribune as Darien, Wis., via Deer Grove, Serryse, Lake Zurich, Lamar, McHenry, Kingwood, Hebron and Walworth April 11, 1853. (13)

He was reelected Ela Township Supervisor and Justice of the Peace April 4, 1854. (51,62,67)
May 23, 1854 he asked the Ela Township Highway Commissioners to build a road running south from what is now Buesching Road and Rand Road. (68)
(Before 1865 Ela Township officials worked out of their houses.) (57)

When the Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad was extended northwest to Cary in 1854, the question arose as to where to place train stations. A community had developed in Deer Grove at Dundee Road. A small depot was built along the tracks surrounded by stores owned by George Ela and the brothers Matt and Feif Friend. The men wanted to form a village, but farmers Ezekiel Cady and Barney Elfrink refused to sell their land to the railroad. The farmers didn’t want saloons corrupting their young people. (70,71)

George Ela's Original House-Store in Barrington

George Ela’s Original House-Store in Barrington. Courtesy Arnett C. Lines Collection

The contratemps over liquor caused half the community to leave. The railroad responded by placing the station on a flatcar and relocating it to Lake Cook Road. The Friend brothers moved their store nearby with 35 yoke of oxen. George moved his store to what is now 235 East Main Street just east of the tracks. The Salem Evangelical Church of Deer Grove eventually moved to Barrington too.

George had a well and garden in the front of his building with a picket fence among lilac bushes. The store became known as the North Side Grocery. It was later moved to 126 South Northwest Highway and now houses the offices of John Peter Curielli. (30,38,52,69)

February 9, 1857 George adopted Delia Murray, had her name changed to Delia M. Ela and made her his lawful heir. (94)

George was an able businessman (62) and a keen competitor with the Sinnott brothers at Barrington. If one sold whiskey at 25 cents a gallon, then the other across the track put up big signs advertising a competitive price. (39)
George was appointed postmaster of Barrington March 29, 1858. The post office was located at his store. (42)

George filed a lawsuit in Lake County Circuit Court against S. B. Palmeter in June 1859. (86)

George appeared in the 1860 United States Census July 7, 1860. He was described as a farmer, 55 years old, male, white and from New Hampshire. He was living with 33-year-old merchant Edmund Sennett, wife Mary, aged 55 from New Hampshire, Augustina Stone, aged 14 and Adeline ?, aged 21 from Canada. (87)

Plat maps of Ela Township and Palatine Township in 1861 show his property west of Quentin Road on both sides of Lake Cook Road and a house on the north side Long Grove Road just west of Quentin Road (Rue Chamonix). (14,15)

Plat map of Cuba Township in 1861 show his property northeast of Route 59 and Miller Road in the north half of what is now the Barrington Bog Nature Preserve. (76)

He helped organize Evergreen Cemetery in Barrington March 14, 1867. (45)
(A sign at the entrance to the cemetery indicates it was organized in 1816. This is based on a misreading of the earliest tombstone. Mary, wife of L.A. McGilvra actually died Apr. 15, 1846.)

Wife Mary N. Hazeltine died at Barrington, Ill. April 7, 1868. (16,50,62)
He was appointed Police Magistrate in Barrington April 5, 1869. (43)
He sued Thomas and Bridgett Fogerty in Lake County Circuit Court December 1, 1869 over their failure to make mortgage payments on property on the north shore of Honey Lake. (81)
He is described in the U.S. Census August 24, 1869 as being a retired merchant living with Caroline who was keeping house. (89)
He married Caroline E. Hazeltine of Chicago in October 28, 1870. No children are recorded. (50,62)
Caroline moved to Barrington and married George Ela in 1871. (30)
A handbill printed in 1872 by a Citizens’ Committee in Barrington listed George Ela as a merchant. (17,40)
January 11, 1876 George promised he and his heirs would not sue Henry Schumacher and Henry Fisher if they paid him the thousand dollars they owed him. This may have been related to the Panic of 1873. (96)
He sued Charles Maguire in Lake County Circuit Court April 11, 1877 for failure to make mortgage payments on property now known as Barrington Bog Nature Preserve. (82)
He was listed as a Master Mason in a charter granted to Lounsbury Lodge #751, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons October 4, 1877. (44)
He is described in the U.S. Census June 26-28, 1880 as being a retired merchant and his wife Caroline keeping house. (90)

Dr. E. B. Plumb, M.D., 130 Michigan St. [Chicago?] began visiting George every day beginning November 30, 1882 for an undisclosed illness. (97)
Dr. Plumb administered drugs purchased from druggist C. Dickerson. (98)

“George Ela, an old and honored resident of Barrington, died last Tuesday [December 12, 1882] after a brief illness… At his death Mr. Ela still owned the same farm that he first bought on coming here many years ago… He came from good old New Hampshire stock, sturdy, rugged, honest. During his last illness the members of the Masonic fraternity were unceasing in their attention and helpful endeavors to alleviate the condition of their dying friend and brother… Funeral services were conducted by Mr. Allison… The coffin was a magnificent one, the handles being enriched with elegant Masonic emblems.” (22)

Undertaker Thomas Freeman provided a casket December 14, 1882. (100)
George was buried at Evergreen Cemetery. (101)

Caroline E.H. Ela petitioned the Probate Court of Cook County that her husband George Ela died December 12, 1882 leaving no last will and that he left property at Lot 1 of Block 11 in the Village of Barrington and that his only heirs were herself and his adopted child Delia M. Ela, now the wife of John Sinnott of San Jose, California. She prayed that Letters of Administration be granted her. (99)
Caroline agreed to become the administratrix of his estate January 2, 1883, the value of which did not exceed $15,000. (57,95,102)

Cook County Probate Court Judge Joshua Knickerbocker appointed Waterman, Kingsley and Parker to conduct an appraisal of the estate. (103)

The Appraisers’ Estimate of the Value of Property Allowed to the Widow: Family Pictures and Wearing Apparel and Ornaments of the Widow and minor children: $100; School Books and Family Library: $100; One Sewing Machine: $20; Necessary Beds, Bedsteads and Bedding for Widow and Family: $50; The Stoves and Pipe with necessary Cooking Utensils: $35; Household and Kitchen Furniture: $100; One Milch Cow and Calf: $50; One Sheep and Fleeces: $6; One Horse, Saddle and Bridle: $125; Provisions for Widow and Family for one year: $724; Food for Stock: $75; Fuel for Widow and Family: $35; Other property: $100; Total: $1520. January 16, 1883. (104)

Adopted daughter Delia M. Sinnott’s lawyer wrote a letter to Judge Knickerbocker objecting to the approval by the court March 20, 1883 of the appraisers’ estimate of the Widow’s Award of $1520 for the following reasons: that it was in excess of the amount allowed by the State; that the widow lived by herself and the $724 allowed for her provisions was excessive by a large amount; that the other estimates were also excessive; that George Ela was a frugal and careful man and lived in a frugal economical manner and style; that he lived in a very unpretentious manner in the Village of Barrington and never expended more than the sum of $500 per annum in any one year for his family and household expenses. Delia asked that the court set aside and vacate the Award and make a new appraisement. (105)

Taxes were paid by the Estate February 17, 1883 to Palatine Township Collector Wm H. Hunerberg for property in Section 4 southwest of Quentin Road and Lake Cook Road consisting of 80 acres in Lot 1, 80 acres in Lot 22, 78 acres in Lot 23 and 44 acres in Lot 24. (106)
Taxes were paid by the Estate February 17, 1883 to Ela Township Collector Martin Morse for property bounded by Quentin Road, Lake Cook Road, Rue Jardin and near Long Grove Road. (107)

Chicago Legal News published a notice asking all persons with claims against the Estate to appear at Cook County Probate Court May 21, 1883. John H. Battermann posted the notice on doors of six public places April 14, 1883. (108)
Caroline Ela paid Battermann May 17, 1883 to publish and print notices to creditors for presentation of claims against the Estate. (109)

Adopted daughter Delia Sinnott’s lawyer wrote another letter to Judge Knickerbocker July 7, 1883 stating she was the only heir to the Estate. She believed the inventory approved by the court was not a full and just inventory of the property and estate of the deceased. She believed the deceased at the time of his death was possessed of a large amount of personal property, money, bonds, bills and other securities not mentioned in the inventory. She said she would show that for many years prior to his death he possessed large sums of money and that he had for many years engaged in loaning the money upon mortgage security at interest to various persons in Cook County and at the time of his decease must necessarily have had upon hand a much larger amount of money in securities than the comparatively small and insignificant amount inventoried by the administratrix. She therefore asked that an order be entered for the examination of Caroline Ela and for the examination of other persons touching the Estate. (110)

Caroline Ela, administratrix, gave herself personal property appraised at $338.93 July 10, 1883 as part payment of the Widow’s Award. (111)
She paid for George’s subscription to the newspaper Lake County Patriot August 16, 1883. (112)
She wrote to the Judge January 21, 1885 that certain promissory notes owed to the Estate are desperate on account of the insolvency of the makers and her ignorance of their places of residence and wished to sell, compound or file them with the court. She endeavored with the best of her ability to ascertain the residences of the indebted. (113)

The Clerk of the Probate Court wrote March 7, 1885, that since it had been two years since Caroline Ela had been appointed administratrix and had not settled the account, the Clerk ordered the Sheriff to have Caroline come to court May 4, 1885 and show cause why she should not be removed. (114)

H. A. Harnden, dealer in marble and granite produced a tombstone for George June 30, 1885. (115)
George was still indicated on a map as owner of land in Section 4 in Palatine Township in 1886. (25)
The Sheriff was again ordered May 11, 1888 to bring Caroline to court to answer for a contempt of court in failing to settle the Estate. (116)

Undated appraisement of the Estate included Bed and bedding, Bedstead, Settee, Chairs, Sofa chairs, Center stand marble top, What not, Dressing Bureau, Wash stand, Commasr [sic], Bureau, Looking glasses, Bedroom carpets, Stove and 8 lengths of pipe and sink, Old Walnut bureau, Small stove, Flag bottom chairs, Rocker, Small rocker, Lounge, Center table, Stand, Hard coal Stove & pipe, Clocks, Husk bed & bedding, Bedstand, Arm chair, Drawer stand, Chamber chairs, Desk, Cans, Extension table, Rocker, Table, Cook stove pipe & furniture, China tea sett (70 pieces), Glass goblets, Castor, Wine glasses, Glass sugar bowl, Soup plates, Dinner plates, Tea saucers, Platter, Tureen, Plain bowls, Sauce dishes, Butter dish, Cup plate, Custard cup, China plates and Saucers, Pudding dishes, Glass tumbler, Sett of white handle knives, Plated forks, Carver & fork, Pickle fork, Small pitcher, Spoon tumblers, Glass sauce dish, Plated Tea spoons, Silver Tea spoons, Large silver spoons, Double Oil stove, Lamps, Cords of wood, Cutter (old), Buggy (old), Single harness (old), Sad irons. (117)

Caroline wrote to Probate Court Judge Christian Kohlsaat July 5, 1892 that she had performed her duties and prayed that the Court would discharge her as administratrix. (118)

Probate Court Clerk sent Caroline a note May 14, 1895 asking why she had not settled George’s account. (119)
Chicago Daily Law Bulletin printed a notice October 16, 1895 that Caroline Ela will present to Probate Court November 18, 1895 the final settlement of the Estate of George Ela. (120)

Probate Court approved the final draft of Caroline Ela’s statement of income and expenses November 13, 1895. George had $30 cash on hand. His estate was worth $1572.47 which all went to expenses. $2191.05 in old debts which George had never been able to collect were written off. Adopted daughter Delia Sinnott, the only heir, received nothing. (121)

Caroline E. Hazeltine died February 28, 1914. (30,31)

George’s old log cabin was still standing on his old farm in Deer Grove when he died. Fred Folleth later recalled disposing of buildings when he cleared the land. Folleth took possession of the land in 1928. (22,23,37,50,62,77)

Footnotes:

(1) Letter from R. E. Ela to George Ela at Goffstown, N.H. 5-4-1830.
(2) Letter to George Ela at Goffstown, N.H. 8-19-1834.
(3) Letter from R. E. Ela to George Ela. 7-1835.
(4) Letter from Richard E. [Ela] to brother George. 2-29-1836.
(5) Letter from [R. E. Ela] to brother George at Deer Grove, Illinois. Undated.
(6) Survey of Ela Township. 1838. Survey of Palatine Township. 1838.
(7) State of Illinois Public Domain Sales Land Tract Record. 2-6-1841. p.207.
(8) Table of the Post Offices in the United States. 10-1-1846. p. 196.
(9) Journal of the House of Representatives of the Fifteenth General Assembly. 12-7-1846.
(10) Journal of the Senate of the Fifteenth General Assembly. 12-7-1846.
(11) Fergus Historical Series, Volumes 19-25. 6-6-1848.
(12) United States Census. Lake County. Town of Ela. 11-29-1850.
(13) Chicago Tribune. 4-11-1853. p. 2.
(14) Plat map. Ela Township. 1861.
(15) Plat map. Palatine Township. 1861.
(16) Photograph. Mrs. George Ela (Mary N. Hazeltine) gravestone. 4-7-1868.
(17) Tales of Old Barrington. 1976. p. 21.
(18) Past and Present of Lake County, Illinois. 1877. p. 238.
(19) Past and Present of Lake County, Illinois. 1877. p. 269.
(20) Historical and Statistical Sketches of Lake County. Elijah Middlebrook Haines. 1852. p. 48.
(21) Historical and Statistical Sketches of Lake County. Elijah Middlebrook Haines. 1852. p. 64.
(22) Obituaries from unknown newspapers. 1882.
(23) Photograph of George Ela’s gravestone. 12-12-1882.
(24) History of Cook County, Illinois. A. T. Andreas. 1884. p. 829.
(25) Cook County Map. L. M. Snyder and Co. 1886.
(26) History of Cook County. Weston Goodspeed. 1909. p. 280.
(27) History of Lake County. John J. Halsey. 1912. Patricia: p. 38.
(28) History of Lake County. John J. Halsey. 1912. Patricia: p. 127.
(29) History of Lake County. John J. Halsey. 1912. Patricia: p. 427.
(30) Daily Herald obituary for Mrs. Caroline E. Ela. 3-6-1914.
(31) Photograph of Caroline E. Hazeltine’s gravestone. 2-28-1914.
(32) History of the Town of Goffstown 1733-1920. George Plummer Hadley. 1922. p. 312.
(33) History of the Town of Goffstown 1733-1920. George Plummer Hadley. 1922. p. 344.
(34) History of the Town of Goffstown 1733-1920. George Plummer Hadley. 1922. p. 421.
(35) Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Volume 29. 1937. p. 221.
(36) Palatine Centennial Book. 1955. p. 6.
(37) Palatine Centennial Book. 1955. p. 52.
(38) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 9,19,25.
(39) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 28,31.
(40) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 33.
(41) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 83.
(42) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 84.
(43) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 113.
(44) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 120.
(45) History of Barrington. Arnett C. Lines. 1962. p. 137.
(46) Daily Herald. 6-30-1966. p. 85.
(47) Daily Herald. 6-30-1966. 4-20-1978. p. 71.
(48) Richard Emerson Ela: Ancestors, Siblings, Wives, Progeny. J. E. Willard. 1992. p. 1.
(49) Richard Emerson Ela: Ancestors, Siblings, Wives, Progeny. J. E. Willard. 1992. p. 2.
(50) Richard Emerson Ela: Ancestors, Siblings, Wives, Progeny. J. E. Willard. 1992. p. 3.
(51) A Pictorial History of Ela Township. Spencer Loomis. 1994? p.16,20.
(52) A Little Bit of History. Clayton Brown. 1996. p.7.
(53) A Little Bit of History. Clayton Brown. 1996. p. 13.
(54) A Little Bit of History. Clayton Brown. 1996. p. 17.
(55) A Little Bit of History. Clayton Brown. 1996. p. 18.
(56) Illinois Archeological Survey. George Ela Farmstead. B. Wright and J. Carr. 5-31-2000.
(57) Daily Herald. 1-3-2001. p. 18.
(58) Plat by Murry and Moody of house of George Ela in Palatine Township. 2004.
(59) Letters between David Hammer and Terry Martin. 9-2009.
(60) A Compendium of the Early History of Chicago to the Year 1835 when the Indians left. Ulrich Danckers & Jane Meredith. p. 340.
(61) ibid. p. 45.
(62) Genealogy of the Ela Family Descendants of Israel Ela of Haverhill, Mass. Rev. David Hough Ela, D.D. 1896. p. 12.
(63) Letter from Richard Emerson Ela to his father Benjamin Ela. 12-18-1838.
(64) A Compendium of the Early History of Chicago to the Year 1835 when the Indians left. Ulrich Danckers & Jane Meredith. p. 38.
(65) Of Prairie, Woods, & Water: Two Centuries of Chicago Nature Writing. Joel Greenberg. p. 21.
(66) Obituary of brother William Stickney Ela. C. A. Downs. April 1898.
(67) Record of the Town Meetings, Town of Ela, County of Lake and State of Illinois. 1850-1912.
(68) Book of Records, Town of Ela, County of Lake and State of Illinois. 1849-1901.
(69) Undated, unsigned manuscript from Ela Area Historical Society.
(70) Daily Herald. 8-22-1930. p. 9.
(71) Daily Herald. 3-11-2004. p. 74.
(72) Palatine Land Sales. Frank A. Regan. 1982. p. 28.
(73) Lake County Recorder of Deeds.
(74) Daily Herald. 1-16-1998. p. 728.
(75) Long Grove Lore and Legend. Virginia L. Park. 1978. p. 5.
(76) Plat map. Cuba Township. 1861.
(77) Daily Herald. 3-2-1928. p. 7.
(78) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. January 19, 1831.
(79) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. May 9, 1831.
(80) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. September 12, 1831.
(81) Lake County Circuit Court. December 1, 1869.
(82) Lake County Circuit Court. April 11, 1877.
(83) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. February 7, 1831.
(84) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. November 5, 1832.
(85) New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. June 3, 1833.
(86) Index to Court Records, Lake County. 6-7-1859.
(87) United States Census. Cook County. Barrington Township. July 7, 1860.
(88) Comprehensive Plan: The Village of Long Grove. April 2000. p. 04-1.
(89) United States Census. Cook County. Barrington. 8-24-1869.
(90) United States Census. Cook County. Barrington. 6-26-1880.
(91) History of Weare, New Hampshire. William Little. 1888.
(92) History of Pembroke, New Hampshire, 1730-1895, Vol. 2. 1895. p. 249.
(93) Genealogy of the Greely-Greeley Family. 1905.
(94) Private Laws of the State of Illinois Passed at the Twentieth General Assembly Begun and Held at the City of Springfield January 5, 1857. p. 304.
(95) Probate Court of Cook County. Ancestry.com. Illinois, Wills and Probate Records. January 2, 1883.
(96) Probate Court of Cook County 37. Archive Department of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County. Daley Center. Room 1113. January 11, 1876.
(97) Probate Court of Cook County 29. November 30, 1882.
(98) Probate Court of Cook County 23. January 20, 1883.
(99) Probate Court of Cook County 57. No date.
(100) Probate Court of Cook County 28. February 11, 1883.
(101) Photograph of George Ela tombstone at Evergreen Cemetery by David Hammer. July 12, 2015.
(102) Probate Court of Cook County 59. January 2, 1883.
(103) Probate Court of Cook County 49. January 2, 1883.
(104) Probate Court of Cook County 48. January 16, 1883.
(105) Probate Court of Cook County 65. No date.
(106) Probate Court of Cook County 20. February 17, 1883.
(107) Probate Court of Cook County 17. February 23, 1883.
(108) Probate Court of Cook County 46,47. April 14, 1883.
(109) Probate Court of Cook County 14. May 7, 1883.
(110) Probate Court of Cook County 63,64. July 7, 1883.
(111) Probate Court of Cook County 12. July 10, 1883.
(112) Probate Court of Cook County 11. August 16, 1883.
(113) Probate Court of Cook County 11. January 21, 1885.
(114) Probate Court of Cook County 62. March 7, 1885.
(115) Probate Court of Cook County 13. June 30, 1885.
(116) Probate Court of Cook County 61. May 11, 1888.
(117) Probate Court of Cook County 38-40. Undated.
(118) Probate Court of Cook County 41-42. July 5, 1892.
(119) Probate Court of Cook County 8. May 14, 1895.
(120) Probate Court of Cook County 43-45. October 15, 1895.
(121) Probate Court of Cook County 2-5. November 13, 1895.

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1994-??-??. A Pictorial History of Ela Township. Spencer Loomis.
1995-??-??. Palatine, Illinois, in 1929. Joan Murray.
1995-10-22. Daily Herald. “Changes over time.”
1996-??-??. A Little Bit of History. Clayton Brown.
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1998-01-16. Daily Herald. “Quiet, But Inviting Community”
1998-??-??. Origin of Place Names in Lake County. Diana Dretske.
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2000-06-11. Daily Herald. “Ela Township dates back to 1840s.”
2001-01-03. Daily Herald. “The township itself is named after George Ela…”
2004-03-10. Plat by Murry and Moody of house of George Ela in Palatine Township.
2004-03-11. Daily Herald. “the first Deer Grove station…”
2008-??-??. Of Prairie, Woods, & Water: Two Centuries of Chicago Nature –Writing. Joel Greenberg.
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2009-11-25. Website: http://www.curielli.com/the_history_of_the_building.htm.
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????-??-??. Manuscript from Ela Area Historical Society.
????-??-??. Letter from [R. E. Ela] to brother George at Deer Grove, Illinois.
????-??-??. Appraisement of the Estate of George Ela.