Residences

The following information on historic homes of Palatine Township was compiled by Ray Mills and Florence Parkhurst and revised by Connie Rawa. The computerized line art was adapted by David Hammer from his photographs.

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Table of Contents

Benton St., Palatine

Bothwell St., Palatine

Brockway St., Palatine

Colfax St., Palatine

Comfort St., Palatine

Easy St., Palatine

Fremont St., Palatine

Hale St., Palatine

Oak St., Palatine

Palatine Rd., Palatine

Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

Robertson St., Palatine

Sherman St., Palatine

Slade St., Palatine

Smith St., Palatine

Wilson St., Palatine

Wood St., Palatine

Index

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Benton St., Palatine

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5 N. Benton St., Palatine

5 N. Benton St.

This Queen Anne has a round tower with a conical roof. It was built in 1892 by Albert Smith on the site of his brick house that had burned the previous year. That house had been built in 1883. Albert had a novelty mail-order business. He sold the house to Theodore and Anne Freye in 1903. They made an apartment out of the second floor. Theodore died in 1928. Widow Amanda Mosser and her son, Robert, were living here at that time. Mrs. Freye died in 1947. The house was occupied by Harry Tharp in the mid-1900′s. He took over the Frank Danielsen Funeral Home at 25 E. Palatine Rd. In 1987 the Davis family purchased the house and restored it to a single family dwelling. Many original details had to be restored. Note the dentils along the eaves, fish scale siding, rounded windows on the turret, gingerbread, railings and newel posts.

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23 N. Benton St., Palatine (southeast corner Slade St.)

23 N. Benton St.

This Victorian home with stained glass borders on some windows was owned in the 1870′s by Mr. and Mrs. Warren Bissell, who lost a son in the Klondike gold rush. The house was remodeled by Walter Rennack in 1947. There is a round window in the south gable, typical of 1870 homes. About 1917, Fred and Minnie Holste moved here. She died in 1943 and Fred moved to Wauconda in 1946.

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24 N. Benton St., Palatine (southwest corner Slade St.)

24 N. Benton St.

This house was owned by C. DeWitt Taylor who came to Palatine in 1880. He married Elizabeth French. Mr. Taylor was village president of Palatine from 1914-1920. Half of the old frame Methodist Church was moved in the back in 1895 and used as a pigeon loft. In the late 1920′s, Taylor’s son and his wife, Hilda, lived here.

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37 N. Benton St., Palatine (northeast corner Slade St.)

37 N. Benton St.

Known as the Sawyer house, this home was built in 1870 for Mr. and Mrs. Ira Coleman who purchased the lot from Joel Wood in 1863. Most of the old part of Palatine was owned and subdivided by Wood after the railroad came in 1853. Wood purchased most of the land from David Root who bought it from the government in the 1840′s. The north part of the house was added by the Sawyers in 1890.

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49 N. Benton St., Palatine

49 N. Benton St.

This house was built in 1920 for Charles and Bertha Schoppe. They moved into town after Charles retired from farming. Charles continued to garden in his yard and Bertha was known for her plentiful flower garden. They held an open house at home for their 50th wedding anniversary in 1938. The house was sold after Bertha’s death in 1953 for $23,000. The second floor was remodeled in 1997.

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50 N. Benton St., Palatine

50 N. Benton St.

This home was built in 1904 by Henry Bergman for Albert Mosser who ran a drug store at the southeast corner of Slade and Bothwell Streets for many years around the turn of that century. In 1929, Fred and Irene Ninneman lived here. He worked for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. Edward and Helena Brockman, Irene’s parents, lived here. Before World War II, the house was converted to a two family. Recently, the house was restored to its original layout.

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58 N. Benton St., Palatine

58 N. Benton St.

The white stick-like decoration on this house was used widely in other suburbs in the 1880′s, probably the date of this house. Lucy and Louis Flake lived here after their marriage in 1917. Mr. George C. Butler, principal of Palatine High School, lived here next, around the 1930′s.

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61 N. Benton St., Palatine

61 N. Benton St.

Benjamin Waters bought this land in 1863 and built the south portion of the home in 1868. The north part was built in 1902 by James Young. The next owner was James Mair, manager of the Bowman Dairy, and then Charles Klopp, architect, who gave the house its graceful colonial appearance.

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103 N. Benton St., Palatine

103 N. Benton St.

Elijah French built this house in 1864. He ran a blacksmith and carriage shop in Palatine. His daughter, Libby French, lived here until she died in 1928. Libby’s cousin, Flora Joiner, had the house next; she died in 1935. The house has been remodeled several times. In 1939, architect Charles Klopp supervised renovation for Roy LaLonde, removing a second floor flat that had an outside stairway leading to a second floor porch.

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104 N. Benton St., Palatine (northwest corner Wilson St.)

104 N. Benton St.

This house was built by Joseph Slade in 1878 and was American farmhouse style. It had a barn, outhouse, and backyard well. It was remodeled about 1900 by John Umdenstock when a second floor was added. John and Caroline Linnemann, retired owners of the Fairview Dairy Farm of Palatine, bought the house in 1924. Their son John and his wife lived here until 1979. Recent owners have added a bedroom and an attached garage.

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116 N. Benton St., Palatine

116 N. Benton St.

Early history of this house could not be found, but it’s believed to be from the 1870′s or 1880′s. The front windows that go to the floor are unusual in Palatine. Charles and Mary Shaddle moved here in 1904. Their daughter Harriet and her husband, Charles Nichols lived with Mrs. Shaddle after her husband died. Charles was a park ranger in Deer Grove Forest Preserve.

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117 N. Benton St., Palatine

117 N. Benton St.

Charles H. Patten, Palatine banker and village president of Palatine in 1894-95, had this house designed by a Chicago architect and built in 1898. This Queen Anne has towers like a French chateau and is Palatine’s largest and most distinctive home. The original house on this lot was built by John Patten, who came to Palatine in the 1850′s. The current house is on a two acre lot and once had a carriage house behind it. For over 100 years the Patten family lived in this house.

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157 N. Benton St., Palatine

157 N. Benton St.

Carpenter John Umdenstock constructed this house in 1907. It reflects the new interest in classical architecture that had started as a result of the 1893 World’s Fair. This style was slow in coming to Palatine; as late as 1905 Victorian style houses were being built. John died here in 1953 and his wife, Hattie, in 1955.

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202 N. Benton St., Palatine

202 N. Benton St.

This large home was probably built in the 1880′s. It has been extensively remodeled and originally had much gingerbread decoration. The Frank Keyes family lived here from about 1900 to 1920. In 1929, Anna and Silas Nordmeier and mother, Sophie Nordmeier, were in residence.

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203 N. Benton St., Palatine

203 N. Benton St.

This small Queen Anne cottage is certainly old; possibly it dates from the 1870′s. It has been remodeled. The Carolyn Wieneke family lived here until 1940.

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222 N. Benton St., Palatine (southwest corner Colfax St.)

222 N. Benton St.

This house was built in 1868, probably by B. L. Dodge, first principal of the Wood Street School. It has been remodeled but probably was simple vernacular style. In 1873, Mrs. Eliza Clayson, mother of George Clayson, bought it. She died in 1874 and it was sold to Grove Bennett. He was an early settler coming to Deer Grove in 1837. He lived in this house until his death in 1895. Next, the William Wilson family moved here. Mr. Wilson died in 1897; his widow, Emily, and children lived here many years. By 1929, Edward and Alma Tonne were here.

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237 N. Benton St., Palatine (northeast corner Colfax St.)

237 N. Benton St.

This old house has been so modernized that there is no clue as to what it originally looked like. It was owned by Henry and Emma Langrehr who also owned much of the surrounding land. Henry died in 1942.

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238 N. Benton St., Palatine (northwest corner Colfax St.)

238 N. Benton St.

This house was moved about 1900 from the north side of Baldwin Road (now Northwest Hwy.) where it had been the Anson Baldwin and later, the Anderman/Gibbs homes. At this location, it belonged to Tim Nichols who came to the area in 1867. His daughter, Mary Burlingame and her husband, John, lived here with their family and with her mother, Minerva. The house is over 100 years old, but was modernized when moved. An addition to the north was added later. James Toynton, Palatine druggist, lived here many years with his wife, Bertha. He died here in 1938.

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244 N. Benton St., Palatine

244 N. Benton St.

This home is from about 1880-1890. The house was bright yellow, a typical Victorian paint. White houses were unpopular at that time. The house has its original gingerbread on the porches. William Hokemeyer and his wife Anna lived here in the early 1900′s. Their daughter, Alice, and her husband, James Will lived with them. William worked for the Ost Flour Mill.

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257 N. Benton St., Palatine

257 N. Benton St.

Isaac Kubler bought this land in 1874 but never built anything on it. John Umdenstock bought the lot in 1902 for $175. The next year John and Hattie took out a $900 mortgage to build the house that included gas, heat, electricity, and plumbing, one of the first houses here to have electricity. They paid off the mortgage by 1907 and sold the house to Charles Lutz for $2600. In 1909 it was sold to Henry Von Harz and in 1930 to Walter and Mary Wittenberg. Ralph Langhorst bought it in 1946. An addition to the back of the house was put on in 2000.

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263 N. Benton St., Palatine

263 N. Benton St.

This house was moved from Aptikisic about 1920. As it came down Hicks Road they had to jack up the house to get it over the concrete sides of the bridge over Nason Creek (just north of the new police station). The only indication now that this is an old Victorian home is the south parlor window with its gingerbread decoration.

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306 N. Benton St., Palatine

306 N. Benton St.

This elegant, late Victorian home is in perfect shape. It has not been spoiled by any external modernization. The windows and gingerbread are good. It was built by George Schroeder about 1900. It has its original trap door to the basement in the front hall. George’s son, Arthur, owned the house next.

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309 N. Benton St., Palatine (southeast corner of Sherman St.

309 N. Benton St.

This home was built ca. 1879 by William Jahnke who owned a large Dutch type windmill that ground grain for local farmers. The mill was also built n 1879. The Jahnkes moved away in 1894. The mill was destroyed in 1900 when the area was subdivided. The mill was located to the rear of his house on the highest land that was later the garden of Mrs. Clarence Comfort. In 1929, Mrs. Ella Engelking lived here.

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320 N. Benton St., Palatine

320 N. Benton St.

The house of Dr. Ray Gibbs, it is typical of the plain square house built from 1895 to 1910 as a reaction to the fussy Victorian style. It was about this time that white paint became popular for houses. Dr. Gibbs was a dentist in Arlington Heights. He willed the house to his daughter, Dorothy Mair. Dorothy lived next door to her father.

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325 N. Benton St., Palatine (northeast corner Sherman St.)

325 N. Benton St.

Another beautifully restored Victorian home. It is a little plainer though. John Gainer, a mail carrier, built the house in 1902 for $2500. By the late 1920′s, his daughter Pauline and her husband, Arthur Malley, lived with him. Mr. Gainer died in 1934.

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338 N. Benton St., Palatine

338 N. Benton St.

This home was moved from the east side of Plum Grove Road to its present location about 1900, It had been owned by Henry Dahle. Hale Street didn’t exist at that time so it was easy to move it straight east to its present site. It was in the Berlin family for many years. Remodeling of the porch and front was done later by Charles Klopp.

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Bothwell St., Palatine

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146 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

146 N. Bothwell St.

This home is probably from the 1870′s. Note the treatment at the top of the gables. It was the home of Rollin Williamson when he first married. He was admitted to the bar in 1870. By 1880 he was a Superior Court judge and that same year he and his wife had a large and elaborate home built across the street. That building was torn down in 1946. The Leseberg family lived in this house during the 1920′s.

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200 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

200 N. Bothwell St.

This house was given to Thomas Falls Wilson by his children, one of whom was Dr. John Wilson. Thomas Wilson came to Palatine in 1840 and was a part-time preacher. Later the house was owned by Libby Wilson Clark. During the 1920′s, Paul and Irene Wilson lived here. Paul was Thomas’s great-grandson.

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204 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

204 N. Bothwell St.

This was always a two flat building from circa 1900. It is Victorian style and brightly painted, known at the Hitzemann House. Henry Hitzeman worked for Marshall Field’s for many years and for a dozen years had a store in Palatine called “The Right Place.”

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223 N. Bothwell St., Palatine (southeast corner Colfax St.)

223 N. Bothwell St.

This Victorian house was built in the 1870′s by Isaac Kuebler in the Italianate style. It has unusual window frames and a round gable window. A 1920′s renovation added a kitchen and pantry as well as indoor plumbing and heating. When the Quoss family purchased it in 1981, extensive interior renovation was done. In 1996 the original front porch was restored and a back porch was added. An expensive nine color paint job won it the 1996 Chicago’s Finest Painted Ladies Award.

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248 and 260 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

248 N. Bothwell St.

260 N. Bothwell St.

Both these homes were built in 1905 by Henry Matthei, an early storekeeper, for his children. Philip lived at 260 and Annie Matthei Brockway at 248. They are late Victorian with restrained gingerbread. Their lawns ran together before the garage was built much later at 248. There was a fruit cellar where the family made beer, wine, root beer, and sauerkraut. This area is considered the first subdivision beginning in 1902; it was called “silk stocking street”. After 25 years, Henry’s son George lived at 260 with his wife Lou Ethel. He took over the store when his father retired. Annie’s daughter Mae lived at 248 with her husband, George Howes.

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249 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

249 N. Bothwell St.

This home was built for Henry and Edna Heise about 1910. The front porch was enclosed later on. The William Henning family lived here from 1924-1979. The house has its original hardwood floors and claw-foot tub. The kitchen was extensively remodeled in the late 1900′s. The upstairs was remodeled in the 1980′s. A skylight was added as well as air conditioning. The master bedroom has the original dormer but dormers were added to extend the 3rd bedroom out over the porch.

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255 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

255 N. Bothwell St.

This was built in 1870 by James Wilson. It stood at the north end of Bothwell Street (Richmond Street at the time) and was surrounded by a large nursery. When the land north of Colfax was subdivided in 1902, it was moved to its current location and turned. The large brick home was later painted white and a red brick porch added.

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302 N. Bothwell St., Palatine (northwest corner Richmond St.)

302 N. Bothwell St.

This house is of the same period, though a little larger. It was owned by Dr. John Malcolm, a dentist, about 1910. He died in 1925; his wife, Alma, remained here and later married Arthur Feddeler.

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307 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

307 N. Bothwell St.

This English Tudor style home was built in the 1920′s by Frank Danielsen, village president from 1923-26. Danielsen originally lived at Palatine Rd. and Bothwell St.. That location became his funeral parlor, built at the same time as this house.

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310 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

310 N. Bothwell St.

This was once the home of Charles Wittenberg, village president in 1954. He was a carpenter and built this home. The house has an interesting three arch effect on its front gable, almost hidden by the porch. It was probably built about 1910.

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316 N. Bothwell St., Palatine

316 N. Bothwell St.

This house was built about 1870 on the southwest corner of Bothwell and Wood Streets. It was moved here about 1925. The house has a mansard roof on its tower, stained glass windows and lots of gingerbread trim. Architecturally, the house is one of Palatine’s most interesting homes. It was built by J.P. Filbert, who owned a drug store and at one time did shoe repair work. His son, Fred, who lived in the house before it was moved, was a banker and died from wounds received during a bank robbery. Originally, the house was a cottage, two rooms down and two up. Fred added the upper section with the mansard roof and entrance in the 1890′s. He also added an extension at the rear and a two-story bay. At one time the house was divided into two apartments. It was restored in the late 1990′s.

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Brockway St., Palatine

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149 N. Brockway St., Palatine (northeast corner Wood St.)

149 N. Brockway St.

The south part of this building was the residence of William and Amelia Ost and was built about 1920. Ost was fire chief from 1917-1933. Ost Field behind the old high school on Wood Street was named after him. William died in 1943 and Amelia died in 1957. In 1958, the Palatine Public Library purchased the building and put on a large addition to the north by means of a $125,000 referendum. When the library moved to a new building in 1975, the Universalist Unitarian Church purchased the building. When the church built a new facility, the Full Gospel Church of Hope took over the building. Before 1920 the old Stroker house was at this site. The Stroker house was cut in half to make way for the Ost house. The front half was moved to 422 N. Plum Grove Rd. and the rear half moved to 400 N. Plum Grove Rd.

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201 N. Brockway St., Palatine

201 N. Brockway St.

This property was once owned by Libby Clark who lived behind it on Bothwell Street. The small house is from the early 1900′s. The Hecketweiler family lived here about 1910 and may have built it. In 1929, Marie Meyer and her son, Herbert, resided here. She was a widow; she died in 1947.

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217 N. Brockway St., Palatine

217 N. Brockway St.

This house was here by 1910 when the Zuelsdorf family lived here. In 1929, Theodore and Pearl Helgeson lived here. They came to Palatine in 1920. Later, the Schwankoff family resided here.

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260 N. Brockway St., Palatine

260 N. Brockway St.

This house could date back to the 1860′s. It was moved here later. William Kreft, banker, lived here ca. 1910. Later, Dr. E. Sanford, dentist, lived here. In the 1920′s, William and Freida Wiehrdt lived here and in the 1930′s, their daughter, Frieda and her husband, Louis Haemker, were in residence.

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261 N. Brockway St., Palatine (southeast corner Richmond St.)

261 N. Brockway St.

This house was built around 1900. About 1905, the Dollinger family moved here from Wheaton. For a time, Albert Smith ran his mail-order novelty business upstairs in this house. He had started his business at 5 N. Benton in 1900. By 1929, Charlotte Hafferkamp lived here.

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268 N. Brockway St., Palatine

268 N. Brockway St.

John Kreft built this house in 1908. John’s daughter, Emily Berndt, moved here when she got married in 1919. The upstairs originally had a hand pump for water but no bathroom. A small bath was added in the 1920′s. It was a two flat when purchased in 1958. The Hansens renovated the house. A porch was added in 2000.

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303 N. Brockway St., Palatine

303 N. Brockway St.

This house was built in 1866 by Myron Lytle who also built an identical home at 104 N. Plum Grove. This house was the home of George Whipple, Justice of the Peace and police magistrate and was located at 37 N. Plum Grove Rd. When he died about 1911, the house was purchased by Albert G. Smith and moved to its present location. The original wraparound porch was removed prior to moving. One of the Smith sons, George, lived here with his wife Marge. She sold the house in 2006. New owners have restored it.

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310 N. Brockway St., Palatine

310 N. Brockway St.

This is a simple, very old home. William Downing owned it for many years. It was purchased in 1907 from the Downing estate by Albert Olms. Later Silas Nordmeier had a milk station in the basement. In 1929 Fred and Agnes Kleinsmith lived here. Fred was a chauffeur for Standard Oil Co.

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330 N. Brockway St., Palatine

330 N. Brockway St.

This and the five houses to the north were built by Walter Swanson in 1923-24. They sold for $3,500 each. Frank and Queenie Frasser lived here. He was the proprietor of the Palatine Paint Store.

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Colfax St., Palatine

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126 E. Colfax St., Palatine (northwest corner Fremont St.)

126 E. Colfax St.

The New England farm style house was built in 1861 making it one of the oldest houses in town. William C. Williams moved here in 1873. He founded the Palatine Enterprise in 1878 and sold it to Hosea Paddock in 1898. Members of the Williams family lived here until 1943.

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125 E. Colfax St., Palatine (southwest corner Fremont St.)

125 E. Colfax St.

This home is similar to 126 E. Colfax St. and may be of the same period of time. Wesley Comfort Sr. and family lived here before 1900.

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36 E. Colfax St., Palatine

36 E. Colfax St.

This house was owned by Mrs. Burlingame in 1900. She also owned the house to the east on Benton Street. She sold this one to Jacob Hermann who had a harness shop and lived here a good many years. By 1929, his son, George, was living here.

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52 W. Colfax St., Palatine (northeast corner Brockway St.)

52 W. Colfax St.

This house is from circa 1890. An old photo shows an elaborate corner porch that has been removed. It was the home of Albert and Augusta Olms. Mr. Olms was village president in 1893 and again in 1899. He owned a drug store on Brockway Street and later a real estate business. The family was here until the 1930′s.

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Comfort St., Palatine

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154 W. Comfort St., Palatine (northeast corner Smith St.)

154 W. Comfort St.

This late Victorian house was been beautifully restored by George Pitelka. It was known as the Lauffenburger House. John and Salome Lauffenburger moved to Palatine in 1914.

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Easy St., Palatine

Easy Street is in the Comfort Addition to Palatine. It is said that Wesley Comfort had a big success in a short time selling the lots in the subdivision and named this one block Easy Street to acknowledge that it had been an easy deal.

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428 and 440 N. Easy St., Palatine

428 N. Easy St.

440 N. Easy St.

These two houses were moved here in about 1930 when the area was subdivided. Anton and Amanda Laseke were the first to live at 428 Easy St. Mr. Laseke came to Palatine in 1928 and opened Laseke Electric Company. Nothing is known about 440 Easy Street.

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437 N. Easy St., Palatine

437 N. Easy St.

This house was built in the 1890′s. Mr. and Mrs. Schenk lived here in the early 1900′s. Later, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Vogt lived here. Mr. Vogt was a teaming contractor. He died here in 1935.

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441 N. Easy St., Palatine (southeast corner Comfort St.)

441 N. Easy St.

This house is the top floor of the old Mosser Drug Store that stood at Bothwell and Slade Streets. It was rented to the Palatine Athletic Club in the early 1900′s. It was probably moved here in 1931 when that site became the home of the First State Bank.

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Fremont St., Palatine

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308 N. Fremont St., Palatine (southwest corner Sherman St.)

308 N. Fremont St.

This house was built by Walter Rennack in the 1940′s for Clarence Comfort. His widow, Cora, lived here until 1976. It is a very well built house with many luxuries and a beautiful garden. Wesley Comfort Sr. established Comfort Lumber Co. in 1874 and his sons, Clarence and Wesley Jr., ran the business for many years on Brockway Street and the railroad tracks.

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Hale St., Palatine

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18-24 N. Hale St., Palatine (southwest corner Slade St.)

18 - 24 N. Hale St.

These four wooden townhouses were converted from the Wilkening Livery Stable that was in business here from about the 1870′s to the 1920′s. In 1924, Frank Oltendorf converted the building. Each townhouse rented for $37 a month then.

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50 N. Hale St., Palatine

50 N. Hale St.

Built around 1880, this house has been extensively remodeled. Chris Blohm was an early owner. His wife, Margaret, lived here until her death in 1938.

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57 N. Hale St., Palatine (southeast corner Lincoln St.)

57 N. Hale St.

Built in 1868, this house was more elaborately decorated with a railing around the roof of the porch. It was known as the Wienecke house; Conrad and Sophie Wienecke lived here earlier followed by their son George and his wife, Clara.

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156 N. Hale St., Palatine (southwest corner Lincoln St.)

156 N. Hale St.

This house was once a barn moved here before 1870 and remodeled. It had two rooms downstairs and two more upstairs. Additional rooms and a front porch were added later. In 1924, August Rosenwinkel moved here from his farm in Plum Grove. His daughter Minnie lived with him.

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157 N. Hale St., Palatine (southeast corner Lincoln St.)

157 N. Hale St.

A lovely gingerbread home with elaborately carved bargeboards (the boards that edge the roof at the gables). Note the cast iron railing around the top of the roof. It was built for Charles and Caroline Froelich in 1902 at a cost of $1600 with an additional $300 for the barn. He died in 1938 and she in 1949.

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202 N. Hale St., Palatine (northwest corner Lincoln St.)

202 N. Hale St.

This Queen Anne with elaborate shingle pattern on the upper walls dates to circa 1890. The Diantha Lambert family lived here around 1900. Her daughter Vashti, was in Palatine High School’s first graduating class. She became a teacher in Jefferson Park but taught Sunday School for many years at the Methodist Church. The current owners have done extensive renovation on the house.

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203 N. Hale St., Palatine (northeast corner Lincoln St.)

203 N. Hale St.

This house has an almost identical shingle pattern and similar floor plan to 202 N. Hale and was likely built at the same time. Elmer Robertson lived here about 1895. Half of the old Methodist Church was sold to him for $150 to be used as a pigeon loft. Charles and Amanda Julian lived here a long time. Charles had a tennis court on the north side of the house where he allowed Palatine High School students to play. In earlier years he owned a creamery at Kitty Korners (Rand and Dundee Rds.), He was a deputy coroner and clerk of the Cook Co. Circuit Court. He died here in 1946.

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210 N. Hale St., Palatine

210 N. Hale St.

Jonathan Wilson lived here after 1890. He had married Ann Kitson in 1860 and was a farmer. He was later a shoemaker.

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222 N. Hale St., Palatine (southwest corner Colfax St.)

222 N. Hale St.

This is another old house from about 1870. We do not know who built it. The Ira Frye family came from Minnesota and stayed in this house prior to moving to 225 N. Plum Grove just to the west. The Mike Sneible family lived here around 1900. Mr. Sneible was a custodian at Joel Wood School. By 1929, his widow, Caroline, lived here with her sons George and Walter. She died in 1942.

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Oak St., Palatine

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24 N. Oak St., Palatine (southwest corner Slade St.)

24 N. Oak St.

This square home looks rather modern but part of it probably dates back to the 1860′s. It was originally a small two-story home of timber construction with bricks between the heavy timbers. This method of construction was used in the 1850′s in Highland Grove. There was a living room, kitchen, pantry, and bedroom downstairs and other bedrooms upstairs. Additions and much remodeling have taken place. The Richard Foreman family moved here in 1905. Mrs. Foreman was the daughter of the Meissner family of north Quentin Road.

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Palatine Rd., Palatine

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224 E. Palatine Rd., Palatine

224 E. Palatine Rd.

224 E. Palatine Rd.

George and Martha Clayson bought this property in 1870. It then extended from Hicks Road to Oak Street and Wood Street to Chicago Avenue (now Palatine Road) and was laid out with a nursery and grape arbor. They built this house in 1873. It has a mansard roof with a heavily bracketed cornice and gingerbread porches. There are few houses with mansard roofs in this area. The house is considered to be French Second Empire style. The Claysons left about 1879. The Moses D. Brown family and later Ernest J. Plate lived here. The Henry Wolff family bought it in the early 1900′s. In 1929 the house was converted to two flats by Elsie Wolff and her husband, Julius Drexler. They occupied the house until Elsie’s death in 1965. In 1976 it became home to the Palatine Historical Society and was restored to its original construction. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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154 E. Palatine Rd., Palatine

154 E. Palatine Rd.

The church parsonage on the northwest corner of Oak Street was built in 1897 to replace a former parsonage that was destroyed by fire that year. From 1921 to 1939, the Rev. John C. Voeks and his wife, Bertha, lived here.

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130 E. Palatine Rd., Palatine

130 E. Palatine Rd.

This house was built in 1864 by Laban Putnam who had settled in Plum Grove with his wife, Elvira, in 1839. Mr. Putnam was village president from 1870-74. The home was originally on two acres. For a time, the Putnams ran a boarding house here. It is a simple style home except for the elaborate gingerbread on the porch. The inside woodwork is elaborate and well maintained. Dr. Rush Putnam, nephew of Laban, remodeled it for his dental office in 1901. Later it was owned by Mrs. Margaret Landman, a midwife. A greenhouse was on the back of the large property. Her daughter, Louise and her husband, Fred Folleth, moved here about 1920 when part of their farm land was taken over for the Deer Grove Forest Preserve. Fred ran a shoe store on Bothwell St. from 1920-27.

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56 E. Palatine Rd., Palatine (northwest corner Benton St.)

56 E. Palatine Rd.

The original part of this house is likely from 1880. An early owner was August Schmidt who had a truck farm for a full block west along Palatine Rd. Vernon Drewes converted the house to apartments in the late 1940′s.

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Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

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37 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northeast corner Slade St.)

37 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This square brick house was built in 1912 by Louis and Sophia Schultz. Before that the Whipple house stood on this site. It was built in 1866 and moved to 303 N. Brockway St. The Palatine Township offices moved here in 1960. In 1980, the Township wanted to expand their parking lot. A wooden carriage house on the property was moved to the Clayson House Museum at 224 E. Palatine Rd. In 1992 Palatine Township moved out and the building then became the PHD Counseling Center. It is empty at this time.

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49 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

49 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house has been greatly altered and shows no signs of its original date. The steps originally faced Plum Grove Road. The George Kuebler family lived here in the 1890′s. George was a barber with a shop in the old Masonic Building at Wilson and Bothwell Streets. By 1929, Hattie Kuebler, daughter of George and Louise was living here. She died in 1958. The Robert Jensen family also lived here.

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55 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (southeast corner Wilson St.)

55 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house was built in 1877. The heavy window frames indicate that this is a Victorian house. The Torgler family lived here before 1900. Henrietta Torgler operated the switchboard for the Palatine Phone Company in her dining room from 1902 to 1919. Henrietta died in 1929. At that time she was a widow and her son, Walter, and married daughter, Bertha, lived with her.

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137 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

137 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house was built in 1873. The owner, Henry Godknecht, had been a cigar maker who was burned out by the Chicago Fire of 1871. Henry made cigars in his home and sold them in the front room of his house. The shutters placed over the display windows are still intact. The wooden Indian that stood on the porch is now at the Clayson House Museum along with Mr. Godknecht’s cigar making equipment. Henry died in 1915; his widow in 1931. Their daughter, Margaret, lived here until her death in 1974. In 1975, the house was sold to George Pitelka who restored it beautifully.

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157 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

157 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house may date to the 1860′s. The first known resident was Dr. A. N. Sheffner in 1877. The Lamberts lived here before 1900, later moving to Hale Street. Then the Gaertner family lived here. Mrs. Gaertner, formerly Mrs. Senne, also owned the property to the south where John Senne built a house in 1930. By 1929, Charles and Frances Ladwig resided here with their daughter, Louise.

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203 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northeast corner Lincoln St.)

203 N. Plum Grove Rd.

The plaque on this house says it was built in 1872. Records indicate that there was a structure here before that. The entire block was owned by Ransom Foskett. He sold this property and possibly a small house to Andrew Foskett in 1870. The house may have been a small barn that was expanded. Andrew Foskett sold the house and moved to Chicago in 1892.

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217 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

217 N. Plum Grove Rd.

Anson Bennett, a carpenter born in Palatine in 1857, built this house about 1880. His family lived here until his death in 1924. At that time it was purchased by Louis and Millie Peterson. Louis died in 1948 although family members continued to live here for many years.

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225 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (southeast corner Colfax St.)

225 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This small, simple house has a Victorian porch with gingerbread similar to many in town. It was built in 1867. The shutters were added much later. In 1870, W. G. Alden, who started the town’s first newspaper, the Palatine Enterprise, lived here. There was originally a large barn in the rear. Ira Frye bought the house from Alden in 1894. Ira and later his son, Fred, ran a livery stable in town. Ira died in 1906. At that time, his son Fred came back to Palatine from Minnesota to take over the livery stable. Fred’s wife, Frances, died in 1938 and he died in 1949. The family continued to live in the house until 1979.

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234 N. Plum Grove Rd.

234 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northwest corner Colfax St.)

Edwin and Zilpha Converse lived on the Converse farm at Quentin and Baldwin Rds. until they built this house in 1885. This property was formerly part of the Wilson nursery. This Queen Anne has a shingled mansard tower and beveled stained glass windows. Daughter Rose held a private kindergarten here on the property. In 1929, John and Emma Stempel lived here. During the 1950′s, the home was operated as a nursing home. From the 1970′s to the 1990′s it was owned by Harry Benstein and was the home of Aberdeen Insurance. It is currently owned by a law firm.

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237 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northeast corner Colfax St.)

237 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house was built in 1870 and is said to have been built of Kitson brick. Mr. Kitson, a potter from England, made bricks on his farm at Palatine and Quentin Roads. William Wood was an early owner. The house has two porches added later. One of them is already on the house in a 1923 photo.

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246 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

246 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house was built in 1901 in late Victorian style. It was remodeled in 1962 by Charles Klopp, Palatine architect.
In 1929, it was owned by Albert and Helen Schmidt. Helen died in 1944 and Albert in 1949. Frank Regan lived here until 2004.

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249 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

249 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This home was built from a kit that was purchased from a Sears catalog.

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254 and 260 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

254 N. Plum Grove Rd.

260 N. Plum Grove Rd.

These houses were built in the early 1900′s by Harry Bergman and his father, Henry Bergman, who were carpenters. They lived in the houses with their families. Henry’s home at 254 has a recessed second floor balcony with an unusual railing and Ionic capitals on the front porch columns. In 1929, service station owner Charles Eberhard and his wife, Ida, lived here along with Allen Shope. The house at 260 is larger and simpler. Harry’s family lived here. Later, Henry’s daughter Margaret lived here with her husband, Albert Mundhenk. Margaret died in 1940. This building was also the rectory of St. Theresa’s Church at one time.

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267 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

267 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This large home dates from about 1910 and has “Prairie style” details. It was built by Alfred Brodhay, a former village trustee and lithographer. He lived here with his wife, Maude, until his death in 1937. The home has a basement and a subbasement.

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305 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

305 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This small home with bay window was probably built about 1905. William and Minnie Roder moved here in 1910. William was employed by the Comfort Lumber Company and was a volunteer fireman for 35 years. He died in 1955 and Minnie died in 1962.

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308 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northwest corner Richmond St.)

308 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This block was part of the Wilson nursery until 1903. In 1906, Horace Hutchins Hart built this large frame home. His property extended to Bothwell Street. The barn has been expanded and modernized. Horace was married to June Bray and was head of a Chicago business firm. He died in 1938.

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315 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

315 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This cement home has a unique recessed balcony. It is from the 1910 period and was built by Adolph and Emeline Godknecht. Adolf was the son of cigar maker Henry Godknecht. Adolph was village president of Palatine from 1933-1941. He worked for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad.

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319 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

319 N. Plum Grove Rd.

The north part of this home was once half of the Knigge livery stable located at the rear of 44 W. Wilson Street. Mr. Knigge built a new home there in 1896. It is believed that the building was not moved to this location until after 1903. It was remodeled and a brick wing added later. The Henry Dahle familiy lived here for many years.

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328 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (southwest corner Sherman St.)

328 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This large colonial revival home was built in 1907 by Ralph Peck, attorney, banker, and school board president. He was married to Caroline Kirchoff. The rear entrance was from Bothwell Street. Again, this property was part of the Wilson nursery.

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349 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

349 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house has four identical gable ends. The Edward Hahnfeld family lived here and they sold it to Wilfred and Lola Muller. Extensive remodeling was done in 1963.

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400 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

400 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house is the rear half of the Stroker house that stood at 149 N. Brockway St. from the 1870′s to about 1920. It was moved to make way for the brick house built at that location by William Ost. Arthur and Edith Hahnfeldt lived here in the 1920′s. They both died in 1948. Irv and Minnie Hahnfeldt and later son Irv Jr. lived here until 2012. Scott and Gretchen Saflarski are the proud new owners.

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408 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (southwest corner Robertson St.)

408 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This house is a Queen Anne in the shingle style with an octagonal corner tower. Connecticut speculator David Root purchased the land from the federal government in 1847 for $1.25 an acre. The house was probably built by Charles Julian in 1894. He lived here until after 1900. It is likely that early in its history the house was raised up on jacks and a basement dug out with horses and scrapers. A coal furnace in the basement heated the building via floor grates. Later railroad ties were fed to a wood stove in the dining room. Chas. Patten sold the house in 1910 to building mover Fred Haemker. Fred and Bertha had twelve children. He died in 1923 and his wake was held in an upstairs bedroom. It is said that Bertha enjoyed having people over and no one could leave without a sandwich, coffee and her home-grown dandelion wine. Lightning struck the tower in 1934 and caused minor damage. Bertha died in 1936. Successive owners included Palatine’s first auto mechanic Ernest Baldwin and Victor Zyck. The house was a two-flat during WWII. After the war a stairway entrance to the second floor at the northeast corner was removed. A first floor closet was converted to a bathroom just prior to the Henry Schaeffer purchase in 1956. The Schaeffers removed the barn and outhouse in the back. Son John built a new front porch with packing lumber from the railroad. Historian David Hammer purchased the home from Mary Schaeffer in 1986.

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422 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine (northwest corner Robertson St.)

422 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This is the front of the old Stroker house built in the 1870′s at 149 N. Brockway St. It was moved here about 1920 to make way for the new Ost brick house. It retains the wood window frames that show in an old photo of the house before it was moved. It was owned by the Dietrich Ellinghusen family after it was moved here.

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428 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

428 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This simple Victorian cottage was built by Charles Meyer in 1894. Al Hanns, who lived around the corner, helped him build it. By 1929, Martin and Martha Fiene lived here. Martin died in 1957 and Martha in 1975.

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436 N. Plum Grove Rd., Palatine

436 N. Plum Grove Rd.

This simple Victorian home was built by Dr. Muffet, probably in the 1890′s. He sold it to Charles Fosket in 1910. Charles died in 1926. His widow, Mary, continued to live here with Mortimer and Mae Fosket. Mary died in 1947. Mortie was the son of Charles and Mary; he died in 1967.

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Robertson St., Palatine

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18 W. Robertson St., Palatine

18 W. Robertson St.

This large square house was built in 1894 by its owner, Al Hanns with the help of Charles Meyer who lived around the corner on Plum Grove Rd. Al, a carpenter, died in 1923. His widow, Sophie, continued to live here along with her daughter, Vera, and her husband, Theodore Horcher. Sophie died in 1934.

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24 W. Robertson St., Palatine

24 W. Robertson St.

The Flentges were early owners. William Ost later owned it and sold it to Mrs. Meyer. At some point the William Vogts lived here and ran a cider mill in the barn, now torn down. In 1929, Benjamin and Cornelia McBride lived here.

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31 W. Robertson St., Palatine

31 W. Robertson St.

An old photo shows this as a red brick house without the one-story addition to the east and having a small front porch. It was built ca. 1894. By 1901, Peter and Elizabeth Knowe lived here. Knowe made many of the cement sidewalks in the old part of Palatine. The newspaper acclaimed the house for its beautiful landscaping in 1901. Peter died in 1934 and Elizabeth in 1956. Their son Charles and his wife Madeline moved in after Peter’s death.

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42 W. Robertson St., Palatine

42 W. Robertson St.

This home was built around 1894. It has a lovely Victorian projecting window. It is known as the Kiehl home. Mr. and Mrs. Devoe lived here in the early 1900′s.

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43 W. Robertson St., Palatine

43 W. Robertson St.

This house is known to have been here in 1894. For years it was called the Beckman house. William and Alma Beckman worked for the Bowman Dairy on Wood Street. Beckmans resided here for 50 years. Alma died in 1956 and William in 1958. Their son, Norman, lived here after their deaths.

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104 W. Robertson St., Palatine (northwest corner Brockway St.)

104 W. Robertson St.

This house was also built around 1894. Herman and Dorothea Fisher lived here is the early 1900′s. They had a large dovery behind the house. Their daughter Minnie lived here in 1929. She married Fred Wildhagen.

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143 W. Robertson St., Palatine

143 W. Robertson St.

This home was once the barn of John Wesarg who lived in the house on the corner. The family of Kasimir and Catherine Zyc lived here many years.

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Sherman St., Palatine

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156 E. Sherman St., Palatine (northwest corner Oak St.)

156 E. Sherman St.

This late Victorian house has been beautifully cared for. It was known as the Babcock house, owned by Charles and Emma. His father was a Civil War veteran and he was a steamfitter. He died in 1937.

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Slade St., Palatine

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156 E. Slade St., Palatine

156 E. Slade St.

Built by Jacob Herschberger in the 1870′s this is a simple Midwest farm house type called vernacular. It is typical of a great many of the Palatine houses built before 1885. Some of these rather plain homes may have had Victorian gingerbread decorations removed after 1910 when it was out of style. Note the circular windows in the gable. Many houses of this period have the same window or variations of it. Laura and William Danielsen lived here in 1929.

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132 E. Slade St., Palatine

132 E. Slade St.

The Gossweller family came from Long Grove to live this house in 1907. It was built then by Ben Wenegar, carpenter/contractor. By 1929 Louisa Gossweller was a widow and her daughter, Ida, and her husband Walter Meyer came to live with her.

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121 E. Slade St., Palatine

121 E. Slade St.

This land was platted in 1896 and the house built in 1910 by Clarence and Rose Plagge. The potting shed is original to the house. In 1929, the Charles Folz family lived here. He was a Palatine policeman and then police chief from 1941-1949. The front porch has been enclosed. A family room was added to replace the open porch but the original cistern is under it. The sun room was added in 1993.

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60 E. Slade St., Palatine northwest corner Benton St.

60 E. Slade St.

This simple cottage was built by John Pahlman in 1865. He came to Palatine township in 1853 and died in 1874. A photo taken about 1900 shows his son, “Grandpa” Herman Pahlman standing beside the house. The porch was not enclosed and there was no picket fence. Members of the Pahlman family lived here until 1948.

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49 E. Slade St., Palatine

49 E. Slade St.

This Victorian cottage has nice stained glass windows and gingerbread details. Zelda Daniels was born here about 1885 and at the turn of the century the Ben Jacoby family lived here. By 1929, William and Emma Schwankoff were in residence.

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43 E. Slade St., Palatine

43 E. Slade St.

Joel Wood owned this property in 1855. It was originally four lots, two on Slade St. and two behind backing to Palatine Road. The Midwestern style farmhouse was built in 1899. A two-story carriage house is original to the property. The sun porch was formerly open; the house’s clapboard is original. During the 1920′s and 1930′s Fred and Caroline Schuenemann lived here and then their son Henry and family.

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24 E. Slade St., Palatine (northwest corner Hale St.)

24 E. Slade St.

This large square house was built in 1910 by Ben Wenegar. This style was popular at that time. It was stucco originally and covered with stone about 1970. Ben also built the brick Wood Street School in 1912.

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19 E. Slade St., Palatine

19 E. Slade St.

This little Victorian home probably dates from 1870-1880. It has typical heavy window frames and little remodeling. Jacob Burkhardt lived here. He had a shoe repair shop in the 1890′s. By 1929 the Charles Snyder family lived here.

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9 E. Slade St., Palatine

9 E. Slade St.

Built by Conrad Hildebrandt who married Bertha Dahms; they lived here ca. 1900. Bertha died in 1923 and Conrad remarried.

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3 E. Slade St., Palatine

3 E. Slade St.

In 1864, Darius Wood, brother of Joel Wood, built the original part of this house as a general store facing Plum Grove Road with his house in the rear. It was Palatine’s Post Office at that time and Wood was the post master for ten years. He closed the store after 32 years and in 1899 he sold the building to Ike Blum. In 1910, Blum removed the store entrance and added a second floor. Later this was made into an apartment. The garage is the original carriage house. The home was sold to William Schragge who had his real estate business here as well as his residence.

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Smith St., Palatine

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411 N. Smith St., Palatine (southeast corner Robertson St.)

411 N. Smith St.

John Wesarg came to Palatine in 1910 from Schaumburg and lived here until he died in 1938 at the age of 89. His wife, Minnie, died in 1930.

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Wilson St., Palatine

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36 E. Wilson St., Palatine (northeast corner Hale St.)

36 E. Wilson St.

A large frame house built in 1878 by Milton Fosket has probably not changed much. This house seems to have been a twin of the Harris Webster house at 18 E. Wood St. built about the same time but much changed by remodeling. Mr. and Mrs. James Daniels moved here in 1906. Their daughter, Zelda Bennett, lived here many years. She was Palatine’s first telephone operator.

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Wood St., Palatine

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104 E. Wood St., Palatine

104 E. Wood St.

This painted two-story house is possibly made of Kitson brick (from John Kitson who made bricks on his farm on Quentin Road) and is reported to date from the 1870′s. The Pohlman family lived here around 1900. In 1929, Fred Berlin lived here.

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55 E. Wood St., Palatine

55 E. Wood St.

This simple farmhouse was built by Milan Reynolds, ca. 1880. He came to Palatine in 1861 and was a partner of Zimmer Hardware until 1906. In the mid 1900′s, Stuart Paddock, publisher of the Enterprise/Daily Herald lived here for many years. Mr. Paddock built a garage around 1957 and added a porch. In the 1980′s, the attic was opened up and dormers added.

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43 E. Wood St., Palatine

43 E. Wood St.

This home was built in the 1870′s or 1880′s probably by Jacob Wenegar at 16 E. Slade Street. It was moved here around 1910. Herman Rennack lived here for a time. Fred Wickersheim retired from farming about 1918 and moved here with his wife Minnie and his daughter Anne.

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35 E. Wood St., Palatine

35 E. Wood St.

Elisha Fenton came to Palatine in 1859 with his family. He started this home before enlisting in the Army at the start of the Civil War. He returned and finished the house in 1865. In 1880 the Fentons moved to Lincoln St. and sold the house to Wallace Keyes. Elmer Robertson and Mary Patten owned the home for a few years until it was purchased in 1892 by Elnora Hunt. Elnora’s daughter and her husband Alma and Gus Arps lived here later, followed by Elnora Arps Foster and family.

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18 E. Wood St., Palatine

18 E. Wood St.

The abstract of the property shows that Joel Wood sold the land to a Mr. Halleck in 1859. He sold it to Mary Keith. She sold it to Harris Webster in 1874 for $525. Mr. Webster moved at that time from his farm at Deer Grove. He likely built this house after purchasing the property. In 1884, he sold the house to Michael Umdenstock for $2100. In 1929, Jacob Link lived here; he died in 1944. When the home was remodeled, the porch and window trim, shown in an early photo, were removed and wide aluminum siding applied.

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Index

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Bergman, Henry, see 50 N. Benton
Bissell, Warren, see 23 N. Benton
Brockman, Edward and Helena, see 50 N. Benton
Butler, George C., see 58 N. Benton
classical architecture, see 157 N. Benton
Coleman, Ira, see 37 N. Benton
Danielsen, Frank, Funeral Home, see 5 N. Benton
Dodge, B. L., see 222 N. Benton
Fairview Dairy Farm, see 104 N. Benton
Flake, Louis and Lucy, see 58 N. Benton
French chateau, see 117 N. Benton
French, Elijah, see 103 N. Benton
French, Elizabeth, see 24 N. Benton
French, Libby, see 103 N. Benton
Freye, Theodore and Anne, see 5 N. Benton
Holste, Fred and Minnie, see 23 N. Benton
Joiner, Flora, see 103 N. Benton
Keyes, Frank, see 202 N. Benton
Klopp, Charles, see 61 N. Benton, 103 N. Benton
LaLonde, Roy, see 103 N. Benton
Linnemann, John and Caroline, see 104 N. Benton
Mair, James, see 61 N. Benton
Methodist Church, see 24 N. Benton
Mosser, Albert, see 50 N. Benton
Mosser, Amanda, see 5 N. Benton
Mosser, Robert, see 5 N. Benton
Nichols, Charles and Harriet, see 116 N. Benton
Ninneman, Fred and Irene, see 50 N. Benton
Nordmeier, Anna, Silas and Sophie, see 202 N. Benton
Patten, Charles H., see 117 N. Benton
Patten, John, see 117 N. Benton
Rennack, Walter, see 23 N. Benton
Root, David, see 37 N. Benton
Sawyer house, see 37 N. Benton
Schoppe, Charles and Bertha, see 49 N. Benton
Shaddle, Charles and Mary, see 116 N. Benton
Slade, Joseph, see 104 N. Benton
Smith, Albert, see 5 N. Benton
Taylor, C. DeWitt, see 24 N. Benton
Tharp, Harry, see 5 N. Benton
Umbdenstock, John, see 104 N. Benton, 157 N. Benton
Umbdenstock, Hattie, see 157 N. Benton
Water, Benjamin, see 61 N. Benton
Wieneke, Carolyn, see 203 N. Benton
Wood, Joel, see 37 N. Benton
Young, James, see 61 N. Benton

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