Mason Sutherland

Mason Sutherland

Silas and Dolley Mason Sutherland came to Deer Grove in 1837 with some of their children. Mason Sutherland, their son, had one of the original grants of government land here. He eventually owned 300 acres of farm land at Hicks and Dundee Roads. The farm house was approximately where the Target is now. He married Nancy Boynton, a school teacher, in 1843. Their children were Edward, Maria, Emma, Charles, May, and Hattie Belle. Mason was the first postmaster in Deer Grove. The mail arrived every Saturday and farmers came from miles around to get it. When news of the 1849 gold rush arrived, Mason and his brother, Silas, went off overland for the gold fields. They nearly died of starvation on the way, found no gold claims, and returned home when they had earned enough money. In the 1850’s, the Sutherlands built a brick house in town at Bothwell and Wood Streets. Mason served terms as justice of the peace and highway commissioner. After the Civil War began, Mason and Judge James Bradwell got authorization from Governor Yates to form Co. E of the 113th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. A meeting was held in the Methodist Church in August of 1862 and mostly men from Palatine or Barrington signed up. They went to Camp Hancock in Chicago to train and were nicknamed the Bradwell Guard. The whole 113th regiment was called the Board of Trade regiment. It was headed by Colonel George Hoge and Mason Sutherland was elected captain of Co. E. They left Chicago for the South in November and Sutherland was given a sword by the ladies of Palatine. Years later, his daughter, Emma wrote of the last time she saw her father. She said that he came home the day before he left to help harvest the crops. The whole family worked until eleven o’clock at night gathering the grain into the barn. Nancy was pregnant with Hattie Belle but Mason never saw her. He came down with typhoid fever in January of 1863 and died in Young’s Point, Louisiana, on January 27th. Hattie Belle was born the day his body returned home for burial February 9th. Mason willed all his land and property to his wife and the Sutherland family continued to live off the income from the farm. Several years later, Nancy began to receive a widow’s pension. Post # 89 of the Women’s Relief Corps in Palatine was named after him.

About David Hammer

I'm a volunteer for the Palatine Historical Society.
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